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Quote

Samba—

2 beats/measure; 48-56 meas/min

The samba was born among the slaves on Brazilian sugar plantations. One mythical story (from Barbara Browning, Samba, p., 16) tells of an escaped Black slave who encountered an Indian woman in the bush. They set up housekeeping there in the wild, and their children began a mixed race. The only difficulty was the parents' inability to communicate in each other's language, so their arguments took place in stomps, shakes, and shudders: the samba.

It grew out of the tango, maxixe, and many other musical influences. It was a dance of lowlife rascals in Rio de Janeiro, danced in the slums by the poorest classes. It was an activity looked down upon, repudiated, scorned, ridiculed, and even persecuted by the police. Samba was prohibited; even tambourines were prohibited.

The first radio station appeared in Brazil in 1923 but reached a mass audience only in the 1930s. Casé Program broadcast popular music in 1932 from Rio throughout the country. Several recording studios formed at the same time. Early in the twentieth century, popular music and even Carnival music included many styles in different regions of the country: polka, waltz, mazurka, schottische, maxixe, tango, samba, even charleston and foxtrot. In the 1930s samba came to dominate all others and become a truly national, government-sanctioned rhythm. State sponsored samba schools became the center of the Rio carnival. "Nobody wants to think or do anything else. Now samba is the study of literati, poets, playwrights, and even some immortals of the Academy of Letters." (from a memoir of 1933, quoted in Vianna, 1999, p. 114)

Carman Miranda (1909–1955) was Portuguese by birth, but in the 1920s, she came to embody both Brazil and the samba, later perhaps more as a caricature. In the 1940s, she was "the Brazilian Bombshell" and danced "The Lady in the Tutti-Fruitti Hat."

Samba reached Paris in the 1920s. It was introduced into the U. S. in 1939, at the New York World's Fair, and it saw a marked boom throughout Europe and America in the 1950s.

The characteristic 2/4 count is 1/a, 2; or "quick/a, quick;" but in round dancing, we choreograph and dance as though the music were 4/4. One dancer described the feel of samba music as "a-pic, a-poc, a-pic, a-poc." The two common patterns are the "basic" or "bota fogo" timing, with 1a, 2, 3a, 4; and the "volta" timing, with 1a, 2a, 3a, 4; In these figures, the "a" is a quarter beat (remember that the "&" in cha is longer—a half beat). In samba, the "a" step is a quick step, and really, only partial weight is taken. Instead of "cha-cha-cha," it feels more like "bum-ba-bum." Step with the left, ball-flat, quickly press with the ball of the right, and step again with the left, ball-flat. On side steps, lead with the inside edge of the foot: edge-flat. As in other Latin rhythms, delaying the taking of weight, ball-flat or edge-flat, shifts the hips to the side of the stepping foot, giving a "latin" hip action.

A second signature feature is the "samba bounce." The upper torso is kept relatively quiet, but the mid-torso is supple and the hips and pelvis move slightly. (At one time, samba was danced with a big rolling bounce. Now, the samba bounce is much more understated.) Step on count one with flexed knee, pelvis forward, hips tucked under; press behind on the "a" count, straighten the knees, and lifting the pelvis back and up; then step on beat two and flex again, and straighten before the first step of the next measure. This flexing and straightening, with a little lift at the end of each beat will put that bounce in the pelvis. Add a forward and back swaying of the upper bodies, and you get a controlled rocking motion, a pendulum swinging forward and back, the two bodies in unison.

Together, the latin hip and the bounce give a soft figure-eight motion. Keep your footwork small and light. There is rise and fall, always turning, sway to right and left, and the back and forth bounce. It seems like a lot to fit in, but stay loose. Think gay, lighthearted, dancing in the streets; think carnival time in Rio. Now and then, add some tight conflict-between-the-sexes for spice.

Figure Name, Roundalab Phase Level, & Timing

q=quick, 1 beat
s=slow, 2 beats
&=1/2 beat; a=1/4 beat

(In round dancing, we are used to thinking in groups of four beats, so the figures below are described that way, but each group of four counts is really two measures.)

Steps and Actions That Make Up the Figure

Each description focuses on the man, with the woman's footwork in parenthesis. If a woman's step is not given, it is the natural opposite or follow of the man's. Help: basic dance positions and steps, actions, directions, and abbreviations. Non-standard punctuation: a comma separates two beats of music, a semi-colon marks the end of a measure, and a slash (/) indicates a split beat, two things occurring in a single beat.

Here are some sequences to help you visualize the figure in context.

Basic Forward and Back

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4; (strong downbeat)

(or 1a2; 1a2;)

In closed position, step forward L on "1" (woman back R) as if stepping over a stick on the floor, drawing trail foot toward lead (but not sliding the foot on the floor—no shuffling noise). Close R on "a" on ball of foot, just partial weight. Step L on "2." Step over/step, step,

The back basic mirrors the forward basic and can be abbreviated: bk/cl, stp;

In Laughing Samba by Cibula, the dance begins with a rhythm bounce; basic fwd & bk; whisk L&R; travelling locks;
Alternative Basic

1-3-;

In closed position facing wall, step forward L (woman bk R), press R to L, back R, press L to R; In Lamberty & Halbert's Whisper, part A begins with an alternative basic; lazy samba turns to face LOD; to progressive whisks;,,
Box

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

In CP fwd L (W bk R)/sd R on inside edge of ball of foot and w/ slight L sway, cl L, bk R (W fwd L)/sd L on inside edge of ball of foot and w/ slight R sway, cl R;
A box can be substituted for a basic in any sequence.
Whisks

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

In CP or BFLY, step side on the lead foot on "1." Cross trail foot behind on the "a" with partial weight and samba bounce. On "2" recover on the lead foot in the same spot. The second whisk is: sd/XIB, rec; In the Kincaids' Under the Sea, part C begins with a sd, cl, sd, cl; lazy samba turns;;;; twirl 2 sd cl; twirl 2 sd cl; whisk L & R; to criss cross voltas;;
Marchessi

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4a; 1a,2a,3a,4a;

In closed position with lead hands joined below waist level, man's palm up and woman's palm down, press left heel forward and take weight (woman's right heel back). Recover on right. Press L toe back and take weight/recover on R. Keep the upper bodies upright and let the legs move forward and back beneath, pendulum-like. We have danced the first two counts of this figure.

During counts 3 and 4, dance a heel/rec, heel/rec; That is, press the L heel fwd/rec R, press L heel fwd/rec R;

During the second measure, dance toe bk/rec, heel fwd/rec, toe bk/rec, toe bk/rec;

The heel is always pressed forward, and the toe is always pressed back. The figure sequence is: heel, toe, heel, heel; toe, heel, toe, toe;

In Axel 5 by the Cunninghams, there are criss cross voltas twice;; maypole to butterfly wall; curving volta to CP LOD; marchessi;; to a merengue 2 & cucaracha both ways;;
Corta Jaca

phase V

12&3&4&;

In closed position, step fwd R with heel lead (woman bk L), fwd & sd L heel (woman bk & sd R toe)/slide R leftward & step (woman slide L rightward and step), bk & sd L toe/ slide R leftward & step, fwd sd L heel/slide R leftward & step; There is no bounce.

May be repeated with the man dancing the woman's footwork (stepping back and then back with the toe).
In Beautiful Brazillia by Ross we dance a full copas to CP Wall;; lead foot corta jaca where man steps back L; trail foot corta jaca (M fwd R); lazy samba trns to LOD;

In Don't Ask Me Why by Goss we whisk L&R; samba walk 3X; ,, M corta jaca W bota fogo to BJO DLW , ; contra bota fogos; Here, M is doing a partial corta jaca as a transition: fwd R heel/recover, back R toe/recover.
Samba Walks

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

This is the figure where the samba bounce can best be used. In semi-closed position, lead foot free, step forward on "1," knees soft, pelvis forward, drawing trail foot toward lead. Step back on "a" on ball of foot, just partial weight, knees straight, pelvis back. Draw lead foot back and step on "2," pelvis neutral. Repeat with trail foot.

Note the drawing of the lead foot back on count 2 (and 4). Samba walks are sometimes called "pullies," referring to this pulling of the foot. Below, we'll see the bota fogos referred to as "pushies."

In Baby Come To Me by Ross we are in OP LOD. We dance a samba walk & kick/ball change; samba walk & side samba walk; criss cross volta to BFLY COH;
Samba Away & Together

1a,2,3a,4;
In BFLY, SCP, or Half OP, lead foot free, step forward on "1" turning away from partner ~1/8 LF (W RF) drawing trail foot toward lead. Step back on "a" on ball of foot, just partial weight. Draw lead foot back and step on "2."  Repeat with trail foot turning back to original position relative to partner. These are samba walks turning away from partner and then back toward partnerIn Help Yourself by Cunningham we dance a bota fogo to SCP & thru fc cl; basic; u/arm trn & basic end BFLY; samba away & tog 2X;; samba walk ,,
Side Samba Walk

phase IV

1a,2,

You might precede this with a single samba walk, giving your trail foot free. In semi step forward on trail foot on the "1" count. On the "a" step to the side, on the inside edge of the ball of the foot, partial weight. On "2" pull trail toward lead and recover. You can end in open or semi to continue to progress. An alternative is to turn toward partner on "a" and "2" and end in closed wall or open facing wall. In Help Yourself by Cunningham we dance a whisk L&R SCP; samba walk side samba walk; criss cross volta to BFLY COH; whisk R&L;
Walk, Pickup

1, 2,

This is a very simple "resting measure" and a smooth way to move from semi to closed line of dance. In semi, step forward on your lead feet. On "2" man steps small forward, and woman steps forward and swivels left face to end in closed position, line of dance. Do two samba walks to line, walk, pickup, whisk left and right, two left turns to reverse, whisk left and right, left turns back to line.
Stationary Walks

phase IV

1a,2,

In loose closed position or in left open facing with trail hands extended to side, close instep of L to toe of R (woman opposite). Step small back R with partial weight. Draw L to R and take weight. May start with trail feet. May be repeated.

Note that this figure has the features, including the pull, of a samba walk. It just doesn't progress.
In Bailamos by the Cantrells, there is a left turning box;; left turning box with barrel roll action;; 4 stationary samba walks;; closed basics;; 1/4 left turning box plait twice to 2 rhythm bounces;;; face side close and 2 rhythm bounces;
Samba Runs

phase IV

sqq

In half open position, step thru with trail feet looking over trail shoulder (man's right and woman's left), -, forward L turning in front of woman (she steps fwd R between his feet), step fwd to left half open; This figure is like in and out runs in the smooth rhythms and may be repeated any number of times.
Traveling Locks

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4; 1a,2,3a,4;

In OP both facing LOD, step forward R turning 1/8 RF (woman fwd L turning LF)/lock LIB of R using a latin cross action, toe to heel making a "7" (W XRIB of L), fwd R, fwd L turning LF/lock RIB of L, fwd L; repeat;

These are familiar fwd/lk fwd fwd/lk fwd; but turning toward partner and then away and using latin action. Can start with the lead foot and often only one measure is used (two locks).
Chico's Manana begins in OP LOD with traveling locks starting with the lead feet;; to an open basic (in which the woman steps forward with the man).
Traveling Back Locks

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4; 1a,2,3a,4;

In OP both facing LOD, turn 1/8 RF and step back L/back R (woman LF and back R/back L), both lock lead foot in front of trail using latin cross action, back R turning LF (woman back L turning RF)/back L, lock RIF of L; repeat;
Copas (Copacabanas)

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4; 1a,2,3a,4;

In open position, no hands joined, step forward L turning 1/4 LF (woman fwd R turning 1/4 RF). On the "a" count, place trail foot behind the lead on the inside edge of toe. On count 2, pull the lead foot back about 3 inches and take weight. You are back to back. On counts 3 and 4, step forward turning to left open position/back, and pull back; During the second measure, repeat these steps, first to face each other and finally to regain open position again. Each dancer dances a square pattern away from partner and back together again. May also begin in left open position.

Typical armwork involves rotating the left arm counterclockwise and up at the elbow and placing the right hand under the left elbow, as you step with the left foot, and similarly rotating the right arm clockwise and up and placing the left hand under that elbow, as you step with the right foot.

Copas are also done in a progressive manner, without tracing out the box described above. You would dance 1a2 with a little LF rotation (woman RF) and then 3a4 with a little RF rotation, progressing down line. "progressing" copas are little more than samba walks with copa arms.

The Moores' Hot Hot Samba begins with progressing copas;; back to back traveling voltas; face to face traveling voltas; into whisks left & right;
Merengue

1,2,3,4;

Side, close, side, close; May be done facing partner, or from open position, you might merengue apart and then together. Box toward wall, merengue down line, left turn to face line, whisk right.
Left Turns

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

In closed position, forward on the lead foot (woman back), turning a quarter left face. On the "a," step side on the inside edge of the trail foot and with slight L sway, ball, partial weight. On the "2" close lead to trail foot. The second turn is: bk turn quarter LF/sd w/ slight R sway, cl to face RLOD; In closed position, line, left turn to face center, whisk right, left turn to reverse, whisk right, left turns back to line again.
Reverse Turn

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

In CP LOD step forward turning left face. On the "a" count, step side & bk, continuing to turn to face reverse. On "2" cross lead in front of trail (woman simply closes). In second half: bk trn/sd, cl (woman XIF); End facing line again. Notice that left turns rotate only a half, and the reverse turn rotates full. Rev trns are like Vienn trns in WZ. In Help by Hagiwara we are in BFLY wall for stationary walks; traveling locks to LOD; traveling locks picking up; reverse turn 2X; underturned to CP wall;
Lazy Samba Turns

phase IV

1a,2,3a,4;

In closed position, step forward L turning 1/8 LF (woman back R)/close R, step in place L, back R turning 1/8 LF/close L, step R;

This figure is a forward and back basic, turning a total of 1/4 LF.

In the Fishers' Bring It All Back, the dance begins in closed position, facing the wall, with four measures of Lazy Samba Turns (a full turn);;;; Then part A begins with a whisk left and right to semi-closed position; samba walk down line and side samba walk;
Reverse Barrel Roll

phase V

12&34&;

In closed position, step forward L turning LF and rolling body fwd and to right (woman bk R turning LF and rolling body bk and to left), sd & bk R turning and rolling body fwd and to left/ cross L in front of R rolling body to left, bk R turning and rolling body bk and to left, sd L turning and rolling body back and to right/ close R rolling body to right; Makes one full turn. The footwork is like a viennese turn.
Cruzado

phase VI

12&34&; 12&34&;

In a loose closed position, step back L (woman fwd R outside partner), cross RIB of L (woman LIF of R) in loose Latin Cross and turn 1/4 LF/sd & fwd L, fwd R outside partner, XLIF of R turning 1/4 LF/sd & bk R; bk L (woman fwd R outside partner), cross RIB of L (woman LIF of R) and turn 1/4 LF/sd & fwd L, fwd R outside partner, XLIF of R turning 1/4 LF/sd & bk R;

"Cruzado" comes from the verb to cross.

Cruzado Walks and Locks

123&4;
Not a standard figure and not at all like cruzado above. In shadow position fwd  L (W fwd L), fwd R, fwd L/lk RIB, fwd L; Take steps with slight swivel.

May be done with opposite footwork, in other positions such as OP. May be repeated.
In Cambio Dolor by Patik we whisk L lady turn to shadow LOD M in 2; R ft cruzado walks & locks 2X;;

In Samba With Me by Schmidt we whisk L&R to OP LOD; cruzado walks & locks 2X with opposite footwork;;
Natural Roll

phase V

12&34&;

In closed position, step fwd R leaning slightly back (woman bk L leaning fwd) with a rolling action and turning RF, sd L leaning right turning/close R, bk L leaning fwd and turning, sd R leaning left turning/close R; Makes up to one full turn. No bounce.
Bota Fogo

phase V

1a,2,3a,4;

In closed position, facing line of dance, step forward on the lead foot (woman back). On the "a" count, step side R turning LF 1/8, take partial weight, and push back toward the lead foot. On "2," actually recover onto that lead foot again. Second half of figure: fwd/sd trn, rec; Instead of a forward step, you may cross in front (woman behind); end facing line with slight progression over the figure. May be danced in other positions and facing directions.

Notice the characteristic action on each "a" count. You are stepping to the side and pushing back onto the previous foot. Bota Fogos are sometimes referred to as "pushies."

In semi, walk, pick up, bota fogo, reverse turn to line, traveling bota fogos, criss cross volta both ways to half open, merengue apart, and point at each other (ending a dance).
Bota Fogo to Semi-Closed & Reverse Semi-Closed Positions

phase V

1a23a4; 1a2

In closed position, step forward L (woman back R)/ sd R on inside edge of toe turning LF (woman sd L turning RF), recover L to SCP, thru R (woman thru L)/sd L turning RF (woman sd R turning LF), recover R to reverse semi-closed position; thru L/sd R turning LF (woman RF), recover L to SCP,
Contra Bota Fogo

phase V

1a23a4;

In closed position or more easily in butterfly with right foot free for both, both step fwd R outside partner/ side and back L on inside edge of toe turning 1/4 RF, close R near L to contra sidecar, fwd L outside partner/ sd & bk R turning 1/4 LF, close L near R to contra banjo;

May begin with left feet to sidecar.

In Brazil by Webb we begin in open facing position both with L foot free. We start with rhythm bounce to BFLY SCAR L ft; contra bota fogo 2X to SCAR; roundabout to left BJO DRC; R ft contra bota fogo 2X to BJO; roundabout to right SCAR DRW; contra bota fogo 3X ; ,, 
Shadow Bota Fogos

phase V

1a23a4;

In a very loose semi-closed position, woman a little in front of the man, lead feet free and lead hands joined, step forward L crossing behind woman (woman fwd R crossing in front of man)/sd & fwd R on inside edge of toe turning 1/4 LF and pushing with toe (woman turns RF), recover L, fwd R crossing behind woman/sd & fwd L with push and turning 1/4 RF (woman LF), rec R;

Keep lead hands joined throughout. On the first step, you blend to a sort-of shadow and step across to kind-of left shadow. You can start the figure from this position with the trail feet and move to shadow and then back to left shadow.


Traveling Bota Fogos

phase V

1a23a4; 1a23a4;

Perhaps in butterfly position LOD, do two sets of bota fogos, but progress more on each "a" count: fwd/sd & fwd trn push, rec BJO, fwd/sd & fwd trn push, rec SCAR; fwd/sd & fwd trn push, rec, fwd/sd & fwd trn push, rec;
Back Traveling Bota Fogos

1a23a4; 1a23a4;

Perhaps in butterfly position RLOD, do two sets of bota fogos, but progress in a backing direction toward line: bk L (W fwd R)/sd & bk R turning RF push, recover SCAR, bk/sd & bk turning LF push, rec BJO; bk/sd & bk trn push, rec, bk/sd & bk trn push, rec;

As mentioned above, Bota Fogos can be done with a little more body action if you make the first step of each "triple" a crossing step. In this figure, if the man crosses behind on the first step, it will turn him a little LF. Then the side pushing step turns him RF, and so on.

In Rum & Coca Cola by the Shibatas, part B starts with samba away and togethere to a spin maneuver;; plait;; back traveling bota fogos;; to a natural roll to face wall; and a curving chasse side close [1&2&34;] to face LOD;
Bota Whisks

1a23a4;
In CP LOD fwd L with slight trn LF/sd R twd DLW with partial weight and a pushing action, recover L (W sd R trng LF/XLIB of R on toe, recover R), fwd R with slight trn RF/sd L twd DLC with partial weight and a pushing action, recover R (W sd L trng RF/XRIB of L on toe, recover L);

Note that the man is doing standard bota fogos or traveling bota fogos (depending on how much you want to progress), and the lady is doing standard samba whisks. In dancing the body turns, keep shoulders parallel to partner. May be done in other facing directions.

This figure has also been called Progressive Whisks.
In Cecilia by Crapo we dance reverse turns twice;; bota whisks twice ending BFLY wall;; samba walks away & tog twice;; whisk L&R;
Rolling Off the Arm

phase VI

1a23a4;

This is not the jive figure, but a sort of man's whisk and a woman's unwrap and rewrap. In wrapped position, step side L and release lead hands (woman fwd R turning RF beginning to roll to man's right)/XRIB of L (woman sd L turning), recover L (woman sd R to open position), sd R (woman fwd L turning LF)/XLIB of R (woman sd R), rec R (woman sd L back to wrapped position);

Woman rolls a full turn out and back; no turn for the man. Figure can end in closed position if the woman rolls 1 & 1/2 back to end facing the man, or if the woman rolls 1 & 1/4 back and the man turns 1/4 RF to end facing.

In Help by Hagiwara we whisk L&R lady wrap; samba walks; rolling off the arm to wrap; samba walks; rolling off the arm to CP wall; whisk;
Volta

phase IV

1a2a3a4;

Both the man and the woman dances XIF/sd & bk, XIF/sd & bk, XIF/sd & bk, XIF; Each cross in front is a Latin Cross, that is the body is first turned toward the free foot crossing the thighs. Then the free toe is turned out and the heel is crossed in front of the toe of the supporting foot. When turning LF, start with the left foot. When turning RF, start with the R. When traveling left, start with the R, and when traveling right, start with the L.

If the walks are "pullies" and the bota fogos "pushies," then the voltas are "crossies."


Curving Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

A volta that curves up to 1/2 LF (start w/ L ft) or RF (start w/ R ft).
Traveling Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

A volta that starts with the left foot and travels to the right or visa versa. No turn. In Copacabana by Filardo in BFLY wall we dance traveling volta to RLOD; and to LOD; spot volta left (lady right); and then man right (lady left) to face;
Turning Traveling Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

Start with the left foot. Turn 1/2 LF on the first step, and then travel to the right. Or visa versa—start with the right foot, turn 1/2 RF and travel to the left. In Baby Come To Me by Ross in OP LOD ld ft free we dance traveling locks to LOD; turning traveling volta in a back to back position to LOD; samba walk to LOD kick ball change;
Criss Cross Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

In butterfly position, holding lead hands cross the lead heel in front of the trail foot and begin to cross behind the woman, leading her toward the center of the circle. On the "a" step side and back, continuing across. On "2" cross in front again. The man is dancing a path that curves left behind the woman and then up to her right side on the outside of the circle. She is curving right face in front of him and under joinde lead hands. The full figure is: xif & trn/sd & bk, xif & trn/sd & bk, xif & trn/sd & bk, xif; In Ain't It Funny by Schmidt in shadow LOD ld ft free we dance shadow bota fogo over and back ; criss cross volta; shadow bota fogo with trail foot over and back ; criss cross volta to face;

I should note that Schmidt has written this cue sheet in 2/4 rather than 4/4 time so each figure will appear to take twice as many measures as is standard.
Spot Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

This is a solo spot turn. Start with the lead foot, and on count "1" step forward, crossing heel in front of trail foot, toes turned out, and turn left face (woman RF). On the "a" step side and back, continuing the turn. On "2" cross the lead in front again, but it is the heel that moves; the lead toes stay on one spot. Continue: /sd, xif/sd, xif; You can go around up to two complete turns, but 360 degrees is more common. In Mas Que Nada by the Dois, we start with spot voltas left and right;; stationary samba; whisk left lady underarm turn; whisk right;
Circular Volta

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

A volta that turns left or right one full turn as a couple.
Roundabout

1a,2a,3a,4;
A circular volta done in BJO or SCAR. In BJO, swivel RF on your L (W same) and XRIF of L curving RF/sd & bk L, XRIF of L curving RF/sd & bk L, XRIF of L curving RF/sd & bk L, XRIF of L;

I have seen this figure cued as "roundabout to left," even though we are turning RF. I think this cue refers to the man's left-shoulder lead and therefore his progression to his left (lady too), but it's confusing. The figure turns 1/2 or more. In Iko Iko, by Worlock, the option is 1 1/4 RF rotation.

Often, the RF roundabout ends with a swivel to SCAR and then a LF roundabout back to the starting point. In this case, the last step might be a simple recover R swiveling RF to SCAR.

The LF roundabout begins in SCAR with L feet free. the first step is swivel LF on your R and XLIF of R curving LF. (This has been cued "roundabout to right.")

The ballroom (ISTD) description is a little more complicated. Beginning BJO DLW, during the 1a2a3, we turn one full turn. On the "a" of 3, we point side LOD without weight. Then on 4, we do a little ball/change turning RF 3/8 to SCAR DRW, ready for our roundabout LF. The last two weight changes are both done on the 4-count.
In Cuban Pete Samba by Hurd, we are in shadow wall with L feet free. We dance a samba walk lady contra bota fogo to BJO DLW ,; roundabout to SCAR DLC; flick ball change 2X; roundabout back to BJO DLW; flick ball change 2X; foot change lady contra bota fogo to SCP, thru face close;
Maypole

phase IV

1a,2a,3a,4;

A figure in which the woman does a spot volta under joined hands one direction while the man does a circular volta in the other direction around the woman.
Plait
(soft "a" as in "flat")

phase V

1,2,3&,4; 1,2,3&,4;

In closed position, facing reverse line of dance, with trail feet free, the man steps back ball-flat. Make it a little longer first step and so create a little distance between you and your partner. You will shift to a loose closed position. The woman swivels 1/8 left face on her right foot and steps forward a small step onto the ball of her left foot, crossing a bit in front of the right. On beat 2, step back again; the woman swivels a quarter right face and steps forward on her right. She swivels in the hips, but her shoulders remain square to partner. There is no bounce. Then repeat for a total of ten steps. For the man, the figure is: bk, bk, bk/bk, bk; bk, bk, bk/bk, bk; For the woman, it is: swvl fwd, swvl fwd, swvl fwd/swvl fwd, swvl fwd; swvl fwd, swvl fwd, swvl fwd/swvl fwd, swvl fwd;

Although the man's footwork can consist of simple back walks, he can add a couple of refinements. First, he can split his ball-flat stepping actions across beats. That is, he can step back on the ball of the right foot, for instance, on beat one. Then lower onto the heel of the right and step back on the ball of the left foot on beat two, and so on. Each step becomes back on the ball, then a little pause or sharpness, and then down onto the flat of that foot as he steps back onto the ball of the other foot. Second, he can take each step with a bent knee and then straighten it at the end of the beat to move that hip back and to the side creating a merengue hip action.

The plait can be danced in other positions, with other facing directions, and beginning with the lead foot. We recently did it in OP LOD trail feet free. Here, we both dance forward steps, so the man dances the woman's swivel styling.

Do half a reverse turn, plait, and half a reverse turn back to line. This sequence feels good, because the reverse turn is fast: three quick steps (1a2) and a big 180 degree turn. Then the first steps of the plait are slower — 1, 2. It's a nice contrast.

In Eso Beso by Shibata, we dance 2 samba walks in wrapped position; rolling off the arm to open position and kick ball change; open plait to face; spot volta L&R;;




dingbat




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